The Peugeot 307 WRC, which has already sparked controversy in world rally circles, will be unveiled at the Frankfurt Show. How long will it be before Peugeot Sport rallies the car?

The Peugeot 307 WRC, which has already sparked controversy in world rally circles, will be unveiled at the Frankfurt Motor Show. How long will it be before Peugeot Sport rallies the car?


CARtoday.com reported on Tuesday quoted WRC drivers' standings leader Richard Burns as saying he was leaving Peugeot for Subaru because he would not be sufficiently involved in the development of the French team's 307 rally car.


The Briton revealed that, for him, the main reason for his move to Subaru was to have greater involvement in car development. The decision about his future was, said Burns, a mutual one between him and Peugeot, reached shortly after he tested the new 307 just before Rally Deutschland.


The production version of the 307 WRC is based on the top-of-the-range version of the 307 CC (but with a fixed roof) and fitted with an engine developing 134 kW. The 307 WRC is Peugeot's next rally weapon and will eventually replace the 206 WRC, which has won three WRC titles.


With the current form of Estonian Markko Martin and his new Ford Focus RS 03 WRC, Peugeot may be forced to expedite the competitive début of the 307 WRC. But it all depends on when the 307 WRC can be homologated. To obtain homologation, 2500 307 CC 134 kW vehicles must be produced, at the same time as 25 000 vehicles in the 307 CC range, in twelve consecutive months.

The Peugeot Sport team is determined to perfect the vehicle before launching the 307 WRC in competition. Pre-planning studies began 15 months ago, a choice finally being made in favour of a CC version of the 307, at the request of Peugeot management. Building a more effective version of the Coupé Cabriolet also became a priority.


Although heavier than the saloon, the 307 CC required more torsional stiffness and the project benefited from WRC legislation which increased the minimum weight of the body to 320 kg.


The car is fitted with a five-speed Hewland gearbox, which is located at the rear of the engine in a transverse position, as opposed to the longitudinal 'box on the 206 WRC. A conical counter gear, situated behind the centre differential, provides the drive to the rear wheels. The three differentials - front, centre and rear - are electronically managed.


For the rally car, the engine is no longer the XU9J4 but the more recent XU7JP4, still with an aluminium block. Power is approximately 225 kW at an engine speed of 5 250 r/min with maximum torque of 580 N.m at 3 500 r/min.

Original article from Car