Audi is showcasing its Nuvolari quattro concept study at the Geneva motor show, a car the manufacturer says “outlines the direction that Audi's exterior and interior design will take”.

Audi is showcasing its Nuvolari quattro concept study at the Geneva motor show, a car the manufacturer says “outlines the direction that Audi's exterior and interior design will take”.

The Nuvolari quattro is a two-door coupé with 2+2 seating. Its body is 4,80 m long, 1,92 m wide and 1,41 m high with a wheelbase of 2.89 metres. It has a low outline, long front section and short overhangs.

The concept is powered by a 5,0-litre V10 'biturbo' engine with FSI direct fuel injection. Power output is 441 kW and maximum torque 750 N.m. It is the most powerful engine so far developed by Audi for use in a roadgoing vehicle. Audi says the Nuvolari quattro accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in 4,1 seconds and has a governed maximum speed of 250 km/h.

It is mated to a six-speed automatic transmission using shift-by-wire technology. The driver can also select the gears manually at paddles on the steering wheel.

The electro-mechanical parking brake and the shift lever for the six-speed tiptronic automatic transmission operate "by wire", without any mechanical links. It also has quattro permanent four-wheel drive and a motorsport brake system.

The Nuvolari quattro uses the Audi Space Frame principle for its aluminium body, which, the company says, results in a good power-to-weight ratio and high rigidity.

The headlights and the rear lights use an LED light source and the rear lights have adaptive infrared control which adjusts the brightness of the LED diodes to match visibility and weather conditions.

The striking single-frame radiator grille has also evolved from the current design motif, it links together the two double grille segments of the current Audi generation.

From a safety perspective, two discreetly installed cameras for the "out of position" airbag system monitor the front passenger's seat position and vary inflation of the airbag accordingly.

It also features keyless entry, while the glove compartment is opened by fingerprint recognition ("one touch memory") rather than with a key.

"The Nuvolari quattro outlines the direction that Audi's exterior and interior design will take. We are aware of our brand's heritage and will continue this success story in evolutionary steps," said Walter de'Silva, Head of Design for the Audi brand group.

The name of the Audi study pays homage to racing legend Tazio Nuvolari, who was the last driver to win a grand prix in an Auto Union car, in Belgrade in September 1939.

Original article from Car