How many times have you been forced to swerve when other motorists have not seen you in their blind spots? Time to tell them about the new blind-spot detection system, which uses radar to eliminate blind spots.

How many times have you been forced to swerve when other motorists have not seen you in their blind spots? Time to tell them about the new blind-spot detection system, which uses radar to eliminate blind spots.

The system, developed by Valeo Raytheon Systems, based in Michigan, is expected to go into production in 2006 and then become available on the aftermarket.

The Blind Spot Detection (BSD) system monitors the area around a vehicle and supplies driver-assistance and chassis-management systems with the data they need to alert the driver or take countermeasures. An icon appears on the door mirror if there is a vehicle in the blind spot.

Future applications will include systems that extend the blind spot's range to provide lane change assistance for high speed driving situations, systems that provide warnings for crossing traffic, driver assistance systems in stop-and-go traffic, systems that detect an imminent collision, systems that warn of obstacles when visibility is limited and support systems that maintain a safe distance from the vehicle in front.

Helmut Wodrich, chief operating officer of Valeo, said the system can be easily installed on existing vehicles.

"We have had a lot of interest from vehicle manufacturers in Europe and North America," said Wodrich.

"The system is clever enough, because it uses multi-beam technology, to ignore vehicles coming towards you on a normal two-lane road when you don't really have a blind spot.

"What are important is the things that a driver doesn't see or they might see, but don’t realise how close they are," said Wodrich.

Original article from Car