Just when we were seeing ominous signs of an impending spell of Schumacher-Ferrari domination, the series has thrown up another wild card, comments CAR deputy editor John Bentley.

What a cracker this season is turning out to be! Just when we were seeing ominous signs of an impending spell of Schumacher-Ferrari domination, the series has thrown up another wild card, Juan Pablo Montoya scoring a dramatic victory, the fifth different winner in seven races.

It was the first win for Williams at Monaco in 20 years, and must go a long way to calming the troubled relationship between Frank’s team and engine-supplier BMW. Coming after a flicker of promise in Austria, the Monaco result suggests that the FW25’s problems may well have been solved.

For McLaren, too, it must be encouraging to see the old car still performing competitively enough to regain the upper hand in the constructors’ points battle as well as keeping Kimi Raïkkönen at the top of the driver’s log. With the new MP4/18 waiting in the wings, Ron and the boys must feel spoilt for choice…

Another happy player is Michelin, which seems to be making the most of the new rule allowing the tyre companies to supply tailor-made compounds to their contracted teams.

Though Monaco proved to be a weak race for Ferrari supplier Bridgestone (Michael Schumacher and Rubens Barrichello were the only points scorers on the Japanese rubber), I think there’s a little more to it than a problem with the tyres. Though it did win its first two races, Ferrari’s new F2003-GA is not demonstrating the kind of superiority over its rivals that last season’s dominant F2002 did.

Grand prix fans all over the world, meanwhile, are glued excitedly to their TV sets. Whether it’s the new qualification rules or just the natural ebb and flow of competition, this year is certainly dishing up a cliff-hanger. – John Bentley

Original article from Car