The strike by Numsa members at Delta is in its seventh day and the company claims the union has thus far "been unable to propose any acceptable alternative measures to curtail the abuse of sick leave".

The strike by Numsa members at Delta's Port Elizabeth plant is in its seventh day and the company claims that the union has thus far been unable to propose any acceptable alternative measures to curtail the abuse of sick leave.


CARtoday.com on Tuesday quoted Numsa's Eastern Cape spokesman Sam Malanjeni as saying that the union would continue its strike at Delta's Port Elizabeth plant until the company modifies its sick leave policy to make provisions for employees who suffer from work-related, chronic or HIV-linked illnesses.


The strike over the company's sick leave policy resumed on Monday after workers rejected a proposal to suspend the strike, and the union and Delta were forced to reopen negotiations.


"Numsa accepts that certain employees have abused Delta's rules of sick leave absence and that such workers must be disciplined by the company," Malanjeni added. "But it is unlikely that our members will stop the strike until Delta is willing to adapt its policy and make specific concessions relating to sick leave for employees who suffer from work-related, chronic or HIV-linked illnesses".


Later, on Tuesday afternoon, Delta said it had scheduled normal production operations for Wednesday (October 1) and urged all employees to report to their respective work areas.


Delta corporate affairs manager Denise van Huyssteen on Wednesday said: "We have noted an increase in attendance levels today."


"Approximately half a million Rand in wages and benefits are lost by employees for each day that they are out on strike.


"Despite all the allegations by the Union, the official reason for the strike relates to sick absence control procedures aimed at curbing the abuse of sick leave entitlements," she added.

Original article from Car