Inferior vehicle components fitted in cars are a huge problem and could mean that up to three million cars should not be on our roads, the Retail Motor Industry (RMI) has warned.

Inferior vehicle components fitted in cars are a huge problem and could mean that up to three million cars should not be on our roads, the Retail Motor Industry (RMI) has warned.

The RMI’s chief executive, Jeff Osborne, has said that his association has welcomed the continued emphasis on the roadworthiness of vehicles.

"At last there is recognition of the enormous impact that unroadworthy vehicles have on road safety,” he said in a article. “The RMI has been warning the public for years against the danger of using inferior spare parts and has ongoing campaigns against the dumping of inferior and counterfeit spares in SA."

The RMI's executive for quality and standards, Giel Steyn, said more than 60 per cent of the country’s light vehicles were older than 10 years, and urgently required regular maintenance.

"That is why quality spares are so important," Steyn said. "The RMI does not have a problem with cheaper spares or non-vehicle manufacturer brands. Our objective is to rid the country of inferior, fake or counterfeit parts." He went on to add that there was an enormous market for high-quality alternative spares that were generally cheaper than the vehicle manufacturer's brand.

Steyn noted that a good indication that the importance of regular vehicle maintenance and quality spares was taken too lightly were the large number of vehicles taken of the road as part of government’s Operation Juggernaut.

The RMI has warned that even owners of the latest models might suffer from a false sense of security if they did not have quality spares fitted.

Original article from Car