FIA president Max Mosley says WRC drivers would be discouraged from pacing themselves to victory, as Sébastien Loeb did on Sunday, if points were awarded after each leg of a rally.

FIA president Max Mosley says WRC drivers would be discouraged from pacing themselves to victory, as Sébastien Loeb did on Sunday, if points were awarded after each leg of a rally.


Motorsport's governing body has outlined a plan, due to be enacted by March, to award points after each of the three legs of a rally in the existing 10-8-6-5-4-3-2-1 format. According to , the change would allow drivers who have crashed or retired to start the next day's leg and take points while the winner on all three could secure a maximum of 30.


Mosley said he backed the plan even if some drivers were opposed: "Everybody agrees that if there is a bonus for winning on a day, then that is good.


"You don't get a situation where the rally is building up to a climax and somebody may have a big lead and he's keeping his lead and the man in second place is not going to risk anything. The thing becomes a bit dull," he added.


Having built up a comfortable lead by the start of Leg Three, Loeb eased off on the treacherous mountain roads on Sunday to ensure his second consecutive Monte Carlo victory.


And last year, during the final day of the title-deciding British Rally, Citroën told Loeb to slow his pace and stay in second place, which secured the constructor’s championship for the French team. Loeb, it was believed, had no choice but to relinquish his title hopes and end his challenge to Petter Solberg’s lead.


"If it's day by day, then you've got a flat-out competition each day and I think most people agree that that's good," Mosley said. "After a lot of discussion, we came to the view that the thing to do was to consider each rally as two separate competitions.


The championship then becomes 48 days of competition with the points adding up all the way through," he added.


Therefore, the man spraying the victory champagne remained the driver who had completed all the stages in the least time, even if he may not necessarily be the one with most points.


"It could happen that someone comes away from a rally with more points in the world championship than the person who won the rally," Mosley said, "but if you think about it that doesn't really matter because each day there will be a new world championship classification.


"We get this huge bonus that we've got 48 competitions instead of 16 and you've got everybody trying every day.


"It will favour the fastest drivers because those who are prepared to risk it and go for the win each day are the people who, over 48 days, will end up with more points," Mosley added.

Original article from Car