Heated debate is expected when F1 team bosses meet FIA president Max Mosley to thrash out more cost-cutting measures on Wednesday.

Heated debate is expected when F1 team bosses meet FIA president Max Mosley to thrash out more cost-cutting measures on Wednesday.

The meeting at London's Heathrow airport, where teams last year decided liven up race weekends with one-lap qualifying and a new points structure, is likely to be the last real chance to agree on technical changes before the season starts in Australia on March 9.

"Max is frustrated by a lack of proposals coming from the teams themselves and the sport is clearly in economic difficulties," a F1 source told . "The FIA wants to step in and sort it out."

Mosley is apparently pushing for a “zero tolerance” approach on the policing and enforcement of the 2003 technical regulations.

"I'm hoping we are going to see some fireworks on January 15 when Max Mosley forces on them some aspects of trying to cut some costs and even slow the cars down a little bit," former driver and television commentator Martin Brundle said last week.

The most likely outcome is for much closer scrutiny of so-called “driver aids”, including the traction and launch control systems. But power steering and automatic gearboxes could also be targeted.

Some of the costly and complex electronic systems in question were only legalised in 2001 after previously being outlawed because the FIA admitted they were unable to police them effectively.

"Electronics and other technical advancements have to be reduced," BMW Motorsport boss Gerhard Berger told last week. "Nowadays a 17-year-old like Nico Rosberg (son of former champion Keke, who tested for Williams last month) can come along and instantly achieve top times. There's something wrong there. Today, everything is automatic. All the driver has to do is to find the braking point."

The question of engines could figure on the latter agenda. Some teams are suggesting that manufacturers be obliged to supply more than one team or be fined an amount equivalent to the cost of an engine deal.

The cost of engines, generally in excess of R130 million for a season, is a crippling burden for the smaller teams, such as Sauber, Jordan and Minardi.

Original article from Car