Representatives of the FIA, F1 bosses and manufacturers’ technical teams are meeting in Monaco today to discuss proposals for a radical shake-up of the sport from 2008 onwards.

Representatives of the FIA, F1 bosses and manufacturers’ technical teams will be meeting in Monaco today to discuss proposals for a radical shake-up of the sport from 2008 onwards.


FIA president Max Mosley wants to limit engine capacity to 2,4-litre V8s, reintroduce manual gearboxes and clutches, ban power steering systems, reduce chassis weight limits by 50 kg, reduce front- and increase rear tyre width and introduce standard engine control units for future F1 cars.


Some proposed measures aim to slash the costs of running an F1 team… If Mosley had his way, a tyre supply monopoly would be given to one firm, tyre changes during a race be outlawed, private testing would be drastically restricted, engines would have to last two races each with penalty for unscheduled changes, no spare cars would be allowed at an event and there would also be no restriction on the sale, loan or exchange of a chassis.


Furthermore, constructors would be allowed to race up to four cars each to encourage major teams to supply others with cars and information. There would be a new qualifying system and cars could be held under “parc ferme” conditions throughout the event.


The radical proposals are the most far-reaching the sport has been presented with and the FIA can impose them from 2008, when the existing Concorde Agreement between the body and the competing teams expire.


However, the measures could be introduced earlier if teams agree. The big question remains the stance of the manufacturers involved in the sport – although Ferrari, which dominates the sport, has been supportive of change.


Mosley and Formula One commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone visited Ferrari’s Maranello factory before the San Marino Grand Prix and the FIA president held talks with Mario Theissen, motorsport head of BMW, before the FIA proposals were made public.


The signs are that the FIA president already feels secure enough to move forward. While all agree on the need to cut costs, there is still considerable debate about how to do that.


Paul Stoddart, the boss of perennial F1 minnow team Minardi, said he agreed with roughly half of the proposals.


”I’d like to think that Max will look at it objectively because there are things in there that won’t suit the sport,” he said.


“What we must not fail to do this time is to equalise the sport a bit. We don’t always want to see the same one or two cars win”.

Original article from Car