An increasing number of manufacturers regard rallying as more of a marketing tool than Formula One. Do you agree?

An increasing number of manufacturers regard rallying as more of a marketing tool than Formula One.

says that despite the glamour of Formula One, manufacturers are switching to rallying because they believe it is cheaper to participate in and its fan base is growing. Fans have also complained that the dominance of Ferrari has made F1 boring.

It costs between R675 million and R2,7 billion annually for a team to race in Formula One, and between R180 million and R750 million to participate in rallying.

Peugeot pulled out of Formula One and went back to rallying in 1999. "It has been cheaper for us to become world rally champion, and with a lower budget, than to earn only a few points in Grand Prix racing when we were only suppliers of F1 engines. We just did not get enough return on investment in F1." Corrado Provera, sports director of Peugeot, told .

Provera said participating in rallying had helped Peugeot with the average age of its 206 buyer dropping from 43 to 37 years old. "But you have to be successful in competition and offer a good product," said Provera.

"With our championship cars we have proven why the Peugeot 206 is Europe's best-selling car. In turn, our performance also made it clear that the 206 appeals to young customers because sports success means fun to drive."

Toyota is entering its second year in Formula One, but a consultant told the newspaper they would be better suited to rallying. "F1 engagement makes sense for Ferrari and also BMW and Mercedes-Benz because these brands are linked with fast cars and performance," John Jullens, principal of BBDO consulting in Munich, said. "But for Toyota, F1 may help to improve their image, but then they have to be successful."

What do you think?

Original article from Car