The Ferrari F2005, which should get its first outing at the Spanish Grand Prix, is the first scarlet F1 car since 1998 not designed by South African Rory Byrne. Is that a bad omen for the Scuderia?

The Ferrari F2005, which should get its first outing at the Spanish Grand Prix, is the first scarlet F1 car since 1998 not designed by South African Rory Byrne. Is that a bad omen for the Scuderia?


Speaking at the recent unveiling of the Scuderia’s challenger for the 2005 season, Byrne admitted that Italian Aldo Costa had designed the new Ferrari, but the Bedfordview-born design guru (who maintains the chief designer title), called F2005 the “best ever” scarlet car, adding that Costa was responsible for the entire project.


In the fast-paced world of cutting-edge Formula One technology, the F2005 is ironically not as efficient as the current F2004 M due to new regulations, which include restrictions on cars’ aerodynamic paraphernalia, the use of the same set of tyres for qualifying and the race and the fact that engines must last two Grand Prix weekends.


“Overall, we have lost a bit in performance terms, especially because of the longer life required from engines and tyres,” Byrne was quoted as saying. “However, we are working to overcome this deficit. We need to find the right compromise and be sure to make the right tyre choice, which will play an even more important role than usual. Obviously, tyre deterioration will affect performance."


“We have worked on traction control, weight distribution and a whole range of critical factors,” Ferrari technical director Ross Brawn said, adding that Byrne was now in a “different” role and acted as a “father” figure for Costa.


Ferrari test driver Luca Badoer is currently testing the F2005 at Fiorano and “the second (chassis) will probably be ready after Malaysia, because at the moment it is still being used for the crash test,” said Brawn. “When we have two chassis, we will be able to do more testing. Of course, we want to race the new car as soon as possible, and to do that we need to gather a lot of data”.


So when will the F2005 make its race début? “Probably Barcelona,” said Brawn. “But we will have to see how testing goes. Maybe it might be possible to introduce it in Bahrain. It also depends how the F2004 M goes in the races. If it is competitive, then we can get on with things more calmly.”


“(Considering race strategies for the upcoming season), we will have to see how things go at different circuits. I do not expect a big change in the number of pit stops and I think there will usually be 2 or 3 stops. Obviously, now the calculations will be based purely on the fuel load, given that the tyres do not change and so the strategy will vary from circuit to circuit,” the Briton added. “In a short space of time, we will find the right way to go between a little and a lot of fuel in relation to tyre wear. We like this challenge. Those who do the best job will create interesting opportunities.”


“The new 055 V10 engine was based on last year’s, but it has improved in every area. The key element is the fact it must last for two Grands Prix,” said Ferrari engine boss Paulo Martinelli. “The architecture is similar to last year’s. But the mechanical elements, the electronics and almost all of the components have been revised. We worked above all to ensure the best possible integration with the car. But our work is not finished, as it is on-going.”


“As for the gearbox, we have improved its structure,” Brawn added. “The internals and operation are different to the work we did initially, before the new rules forced us to change the design. We won’t have this new gearbox for the first few races, but the one we will use will be a good compromise”.

Original article from Car