Motorists who have not changed to the new credit-card style licence may have their insurance claims delayed until they get the new licence or a temporary version.

Motorists who have not changed to the new credit-card style licence may have their insurance claims delayed until they get the new licence or a temporary version.

The licence in the identity book will become illegal from March 1. The South African Insurance Association (SAIA) initially said it would honour claims made with the ID book licence, but once the Department of Transport said that this licence would “cease to be deemed to be a driving licence issued under the National Road Traffic Act No. 93 of 1996”, the situation changed.

“Before any claims are met, the insured may be required by insurers to provide them with proof of such licence and this may obviously result in delays in settlement while such proof is being obtained. “Insurers may require that the proof of such licence must take the form of either a credit card type licence or a temporary licence issued by the Traffic Authority,” said SAIA executive Caroline da Silva.

“Drivers who are not in possession of a credit card type licence after March 1 will still be “licensed” to drive as required by the policy wording. These drivers will, however, not be able to provide valid proof of such licensing, unless in possession of either a credit card type license or a temporary licence,” said Da Silva.

She added that if the claimant cannot eventually produce either of the acceptable licence permits their claims may not be paid.

Original article from Car