Minardi’s attempts to race in Sunday’s grand prix despite its cars not conforming to technical regulations were boosted on Friday when a State of Victoria judge granted the team an interim injunction to participate in Saturday’s practice and qualifying sessions.

Minardi’s attempts to race in Sunday’s grand prix despite its cars not conforming to technical regulations were boosted on Friday when a State of Victoria judge granted the team an interim injunction to participate in Saturday’s practice and qualifying sessions.


“Mr Justice Hapersberger of the Supreme Court of the State of Victoria this afternoon granted an interim injunction to allow the Minardi F1 team to take part in the 2005 Australian Grand Prix practice and qualifying sessions on Saturday, March 5, with the cars in 2004 chassis and engine specification. A further hearing is scheduled for 2 pm (Australian time) on March 5, at which time the FIA (F1’s governing body), if it wishes, can appear and respond to the application,” the team said in a statement.


By coincidence or otherwise, the second hearing takes place just after the end of qualifying.


The struggling Faenza-based team has been at the centre of a media frenzy in Stoddart’s home country this week. F1 rookies Christijan Albers and Patrick Friesacher had to sit out the two practice sessions for the Australian Grand Prix on Friday morning after stewards said it was "inappropriate and unacceptable" for Minardi to race with cars which did not meet 2005 technical rules.


"It is our view that it is inappropriate and unacceptable to alter the technical regulations with which all competitors comply in order to suit the individual needs of one competitor," read a statement from the stewards.


At the time of the report, some news agencies claimed all the teams had agreed, at the proverbial eleventh hour, that Minardi could participate in the race despite not conforming to regulations. Other agencies maintained that Stoddart’s repeated pleas to Ferrari team boss Jean Todt had still not succeeded.


"Todt asked me to get (FIA race director) Charlie Whiting to present it to him. I did and Charlie doesn't feel it is his job," the Minardi boss said on Thursday. Red Bull also did not approve of Minardi's cars but it and Jordan were reportedly bound by the agreement signed by the teams’ previous managements.


There was also a possibility of Minardi racing under appeal on Sunday. As a last resort, the team could attempt to convert the cars to 2005 specifications. The team has two sets of parts, which means there is little leeway should either of his drivers do any damage.


"We'll try," Stoddart said, "I'm not sure we're going to make that, but we'll try. Expect the midnight oil to be well and truly burned tonight if we have to go that way."

Original article from Car