Citroën Sebastien Loeb is rethinking his tactics for this weekend's Tour de Corse now that he is driving for the championship and not just a win.

Citroën Sebastien Loeb says he is rethinking his tactics for this weekend's Tour de Corse now that he is driving for the championship and not just the rally win.


CARtoday.com reported recently that Loeb's victory in San Remo vaulted him to second in the title race, just two points behind series leader and Peugeot driver Richard Burns. The manufacturers' championship is also closely contested and Loeb told that he won't be losing sight of the "bigger title fight" this weekend.


"Guy Frequelin (Citroën team principal) says that to win the title, it's preferable to finish all three of the rallies to come. And he's right," said Loeb. "In San Remo, I managed to run in front without taking the risk of throwing it all away. I hope I will succeed in finding the same pace in Corsica.


"That said, if the way the weekend unfolds or the speed of the other drivers dictates that I up my pace, then we will see how to deal with that when the time comes... without losing sight of the fact that there is also a manufacturers' title to play for, and that it will probably be close..."


Loeb has won all three of the season's asphalt events so far - Monte Carlo, Germany and San Remo - but he says that doesn't automatically make him favourite for the Tour de Corse.


"All that these results signify is that the car was competitive on these three events, and so was I," he said. "That's obviously encouraging going into the fourth asphalt round of the year, but anyone who believes it's going to be a mere formality had better think again. The competition is very real. Markko Martin is never far away."


Frequelin added that the Estonian driver, at the wheel of the constantly improving Ford Focus RS 03 WRC, would be a big threat in Corsica.


"Close analysis of what happened the San Remo reveals that had Markko Martin not been hampered by problems, he would most probably have made life much more difficult for us," said Frequelin.


"The final day in Italy proved that a single tyre choice can turn everything on its head. And in Corsica in October, we could well find ourselves having to make some pretty tough choices," he added.

Original article from Car