BMW will be introducing a revised version of the popular X5 at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September. It features a new all-wheel drive system and some exterior changes.

BMW will be introducing a revised version of the popular X5 at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September. It features a new all-wheel drive system and some exterior changes.

According to , there are three new engines. The new 235 kW 4,4i V8 engine features valvetronic inlet control and Bi-Vanos valve timing and is mated to a new six-speed automatic gearbox. It has a claimed 0-100 km acceleration of 7,0 seconds. A new high performance X5 4,8iS will be introduced next year, but no further details were given.

The X5 3,0d features the second-generation common rail diesel engine, producing 160 kW and 500 N.m of torque. BMW claims it moves from standstill to 100 km in 8,3 seconds. It is also mated to the new six-speed manual gearbox. The X5 3,0i will continue with the 3,0-litre engine.

BMW says the new xDrive system enables the power and torque increases to be converted into usable traction in all driving situations. The new X3 will use the same system. It constantly varies drive between the front and rear axles, depending upon the traction requirements. This contrasts with the four-wheel drive system of the existing X5, which works on the basis of a fixed front-to-rear drive ratio. The xDrive predicts any loss of traction or tyre slippage and reacts in milliseconds.

The front of the vehicle has been revised, including new headlamp units, with sweeping contours and integrated indicator lamps. In common with other BMW models are illuminated headlamp rings forming the sidelights.

The bonnet has been redesigned, with sharper edges that run into the trademark double kidney grilles, which have also been reshaped and enlarged. The fog lamps have been redesigned and the air intakes are larger. At the rear are transparent glass lamps.

For the first time, adaptive headlamps are an option. Bi-Xenon headlamps are standard on all eight-cylinder models and an option on six-cylinder vehicles.

Towing should be safer with the new trailer stabilisation control. As a function of the dynamic stability control system, sensors monitor and measure any dangerous pendulum motion from a swaying trailer and apply the brakes, automatically returning the trailer to a more stable condition.

Original article from Car