The latest Ford Mustang, now in its 40th year, promises a return to form for the iconic “Pony” car. When it goes on sale in the US, it will offer V8 muscle for less than the equivalent of R167 500.

The latest Ford Mustang, now in its 40th year, promises a return to form for the iconic “Pony” car. When it goes on sale in the US, it will offer V8 muscle for less than the equivalent of R167 500.


Shown at the Detroit Motor Show last week, the attention-grabbing four-seat coupé was sired by last year’s concept car. It features numerous design cues from the Mustang’s ’Sixties glory days - the familiar grille with inset spotlamps, sculpted C-scoops in the flanks, a rakish fastback shape and three-piece tail-lights. But this one has a wide stance and short overhangs, though.


The Mustang will be available in two distinct models. The entry-level Mustang, fitted with cloth bucket seats, 16-inch alloys and a new 150 kW four-litre overhead-cam V6, will sell for about R114 000 and account for about 60 percent of the model’s sales.


Ford Motor Company chairman and chief executive officer Bill Ford recently said the GT would offer 224 kW of stomping V8 power for less than $25 000 (the equivalent of R167 500) and compete against the new Pontiac GTO sports coupe and the Nissan 350Z and Mazda RX-8 sports cars.


The range-topping GT features 17-inch alloys, front fog lights, leather trim, a rear spoiler and the ubiquitous all-alloy 4,6-litre powerplant – fitted with 24-valve heads and variable cam timing. Both versions will be available with either five-speed manual or a new five-speed auto driving the rear wheels.


The car’s underpinnings are based on a shortened version of the Jaguar S-Type platform. Front suspension is by MacPherson struts while the rear remains true to Mustang tradition with a solid axle with triple links and a Panhard rod. Larger disc brakes are ventilated at the front and feature four-channel ABS.


Inside are more retro touches - a ’Sixties-style double-binnacle aluminium dash complete with a chrome-rimmed speedometer, rev counter and three-spoke wheel. Apparently, the instrument panel can also change colour at the touch of a button to suit the driver’s mood.


Ford has no plans to export the car to right-hand drive markets. But unlike South Africa, where recent legislation prohibits the importation of left-hand drive cars, independent UK companies will be able to procure and sell the vehicles in Britain.

Original article from Car