PSA Peugeot Citroën and Ford are jointly introducing new diesel engines that will ultimately result in more than 1 600 000 engines a year for the two companies' core model lines.

PSA Peugeot Citroën and Ford are jointly introducing new diesel engines that ultimately result in more than 1 600 000 engines a year for the two companies' core model lines.

The 1,6-litre and 2,0-litre common rail direct injection diesels were developed in the second phase of their co-operative venture. The engines are scheduled to gradually equip both partners' model lines in the second half of 2003.

The HDi 1,6-litre engine in PSA Peugeot Citroën's cars, which will be called the Duratorq TDCi 1,6-litre in Ford models, will be available in 80 kW and 66 kW versions. They will equip more than 37 different vehicle versions of both partners.

It weighs 120 kg and will used in small vehicles. It is all-aluminum.

Certain versions of the 1,6-litre HDi/TDCi, equipped with the FAP particle filter system, will offer extremely low emissions in early 2004, ahead of the Euro IV regulations applicable in January 2005.

PSA and Ford are also introducing a second-generation 2,0-litre engine known respectively as the HDi 2,0-litre and the Duratorq TDCi 2,0l.

The new powerplant represents the latest development in the 2,0-litre Hdi family, which has equipped PSA Peugeot Citroën's mid- and upper-range cars since 1998.

At 100 kW, it offers 25 per cent more power than its predecessor.

The engines will be manufactured at PSA Peugeot Citroën's Trémery plant in the Lorraine region of eastern France.

Original article from Car