As promised ahead of the recent Geneva Motor Show, Mazda has released facelift details of its striking Mazda6 saloon, which comes with all the gizmos befitting a luxury saloon, and a sterling new diesel engine.

As promised ahead of the recent Geneva Motor Show, Mazda has released facelift details of its striking Mazda6, which comes with all the gizmos befitting a luxury saloon, and a sterling new diesel engine.

The revised line-up of Mazda’s first “Zoom-Zoom” product – launched in 2002 –will be available from the second half of the year, and local models should touch down by the end of 2005.

Starting on the outside, the 6 receives a new grille with a chrome strip running across the top of the badge and new clear glass headlamps. From the side, the saloon once again displays dramatically flared wheel-arches and the characteristic Mazda6 silhouette. Redesigned taillights in a wrap-around housing have been added to the rear, which also gets a new bumper.

Though the cabin has remained largely unchanged, the interior will now come with new trim, seats (depending on the model) and central console design. According to Mazda, the quality of the materials has been greatly improved, though these too are model dependant.

This Mazda will also incorporate a keyless entry system that allows the driver to lock and unlock doors and start the engine without having to remove his/her card from a pocket or handbag. Pressing a button above the handle on both front doors or on the bootlid locks or unlocks all the doors.

The driver’s seat now can be specified with a seat position memory system, which stores the settings of up to three drivers, and can be switched by pressing one of the buttons to the left of the driver .

The powertrains have also been revisited and the manufacturer guarantees that all engines deliver performance better than, or equal to, those being replaced, along with lower (or equal) fuel consumption.

The new 2,0-litre diesel powerplant (hopefully a feature on the local range when it gets here) will be available in two derivatives labelled Standard Power and High Power versions. Standard Power produces 89 kW at 3 500 N.m and its maximum torque of 320 N.m at 2 000 r/min, while the High Power model produces peak power of 105 kW at 3 500 r/min and a decent 360 N.m of torque, again at 2 000 r/min.

In the Standard Power version, the diesel engine with its new variable-geometry turbocharger and common rail technology, is claimed to consume about six litres of fuel per 100 km, whereas the quicker version consumes about 5,5 litres per 100 km.

The 2,0- and 2,3-litre petrol engines have also been reworked. The four-cylinder 16-valve 2,0-litre now produces maximum power of 108 kW at 6 500 r/min and 184 N.m of torque at 4 000 r/min. With a top speed of 211 km/h, it should consume about 7,8 litres of petrol per 100 km.

The bigger 2,3-litre (also a four-cylinder 16-valve) produces peak power of 122 kW and torque of 207 N.m at 6 500 and 4 000 r/min respectively. With the manual transmission, Mazda claims the 2,3-litre could reach a top speed on 214 km/h while consuming 8,7-litres per 100/km.

Transmissions include six-speed manuals across the range, with different gear ratios for each of the engines, and a new five-speed Activematic gearbox to replace the current four-speed automatic ‘box.

A more rigid chassis has been used, and the bodyshell as well as frame and panel reinforcements, have been made sturdier too. The suspension system remains as before, and comes with double wishbone geometry at the front and a multi-link set-up at the rear. The front and rear bushings have been modified for improved torsional rigidity.

Safety has been prioritised, so the facelifted Mazda6 comes with ABS, EBD, DSC and electronic brake assist. On the inside, the Mazda6 has a collapsible brake pedal, and front, side and curtain airbags to reduce the risk of occupant safety in the event of a crash.

Original article from Car