According to a recent Medical Research Council report, SA drivers have a much higher risk of experiencing aggressive road behaviour than those in most other countries. And alarmingly, several motorists reported being shot at or having a gun pointed at them.

According to a recent Medical Research Council report, South African drivers have a much higher risk of experiencing aggressive road behaviour than those in most other countries.


The study, released in Durban on Tuesday, found that more than 80 per cent of drivers confessed to some form of aggression. The main cause of their agitation, interviewees said, was somebody cutting in front of them without signalling or cutting in front of them and then driving slowly.


Last week, the UK’s reputation as road rage capital of the world was confirmed with the publication of a survey in which 87 per cent of drivers claimed to have been a road rage victim at least once while 20 per cent said they had experienced it more than 10 times.


But nearly as many (71 per cent) British drivers admitted to having been guilty of road rage themselves and most claimed they felt justified in either perpetrating or responding aggressively to road rage.


But the shocking SA statistics illustrate that South Africans can compete with the Britons in terms of tempestuous and aggressive behaviour on the road…


The SA Medical Research Council found that 57 of 1 006 drivers interviewed said they had been shot at or had a gun pointed at them during incidents of road rage. Only three admitted to doing it themselves.


Nearly 10 per cent said they had been deliberately rammed or had their vehicle damaged and 20 percent confessed to thinking about physically hurting another driver.


"Most motorists (58 per cent) reported that they simply ignored or controlled their emotions when they encountered such behaviour," said the report. "More specific (calming) measures included smoking (five per cent), deep breathing - including sighing - (three per cent) and prayer (two per cent)."


reported that the study was exploratory research to determine whether impressions of increasing aggression on South African roads were correct. Researchers interviewed motorists at fuel stations in and around Durban to quantify the extent of the problem - and gave those interviewed a car air-freshener with an anti-road rage message.


A quarter of those interviewed said they had experienced extreme forms of road rage over the past year. These included a driver getting out of a car to argue (17,8 per cent), a driver getting out of a car to hurt them (5,1 per cent), a driver deliberately colliding with or damaging their car (9,2 per cent), being shot at or having a gun pointed at their car (5,9 per cent).


Far fewer people (9,8 per cent) admitted perpetrating such extreme outbursts than being a victim of them (24,1 per cent). Highly aggressive behaviour such as being tailgated, being cut off, being blocked from a lane or being followed or chased were the most common forms of road rage experienced, the report said.


This topped milder forms of aggression such as hooting or making obscene gestures.

Original article from Car