The Department of Minerals and Energy this week said its plan to phase out leaded fuel by next year was on track and that consumers who used 95 octane unleaded petrol or lowered-sulphur diesel would have to dig deeper in their pockets in 2006.

The Department of Minerals and Energy this week said its plan to phase out leaded fuel by next year was on track and that consumers who used 95 octane unleaded petrol or lowered-sulphur diesel would have to dig deeper in their pockets in 2006.


Cleaner fuel specifications, effective January 1, would remove all leaded petrol from the South African market. Earlier this month, Cabinet confirmed its 2002 approval of a recommendation to discontinue leaded petrol by 2006, departmental deputy director-general Rod Crompton said.


Diesel users will fork out more for a new, low sulphur version of the fuel, while motorists insisting on using 95 octane petrol rather than 93 or 91 octane will pay a special levy, the department of minerals and energy said on Thursday.


Diesel that currently contains 3 000 sulphur parts per million will be replaced by a new diesel containing 500 parts per million.


The new type of diesel was more expensive, said SA Petroleum Industry Association director Colin McClelland. The difference in price was currently about 15 to 20 cents per litre, and varied depending on international price factors.


As for petrol, motorists can from next year choose between 91, 93 and 95 octane unleaded petrol. A 95 octane lead replacement petrol (LRP) will also be available for older cars inland, and a 93 octane LRP at the coast. LRP uses octane-boosting additives, typically heavy-metal-based, rather than lead.


quoted Crompton as saying that a special 10 cents per litre would be levied on 95 octane petrol from the beginning of next year, to discourage its use.


The levy could be increased to as much as 50 cents per litre depending on demand, and would be reviewed periodically.

South African producers would not be able to meet demand if every motorist decided to use 95 octane from January 1, but most refineries have started upgrading projects.


Apart from the new levies, there would be no change to existing pricin

Original article from Car