The stately Rover 75 will soon receive a youthful, more purposeful look. However, could the facelifted range, which should début in South Africa in October, alienate some of the more conservative buyers?

The stately Rover 75 will soon receive a youthful, more purposeful look. However, could the facelifted range, which should début in South Africa in October, alienate some of the more conservative buyers?


The sharper front end comes courtesy of new halogen projector headlights, a larger integrated radiator grille, lower grilles in the front bumper, new indicator and side repeater lamps, newly-positioned badges and new alloy wheel designs.


But the 75 and its Tourer sibling have also been given with improved locking wheel bolts, a larger selection of paint colours and three new interior trim levels. The steering has also been uprated to make it a little more responsive and direct.


According to a report, the revised specification levels will be badged Classic, Connoisseur and Contemporary. Classic models have burr walnut trim, cloth upholstery and a CD player and air conditioning is now standard. The Connoisseur models have light oak trim, automatic climate control and rear electric windows.


Connoisseur SE versions add a wood/leather steering wheel, a wooden manual gearknob, piped leather upholstery, heated electric seats with memory settings, reverse parking sensors and tailored carpet mats. String-backed drivers' gloves are optional.


The new spec level, Contemporary, is aimed at the more sporting younger buyer: this gives black oak trim, black cloth sports seats, automatic climate control, front fog lamps and 16-inch alloys.


Contemporary SE models have 17-inch alloys, black leather seats with electric adjustment and memory settings, rain-sensing wipers, a trip computer, parking sensors and a Harman/Kardon audio system. On the British market, satellite navigation, an electric glass sunroof and sports suspension will be optional.

Original article from Car