The upcoming Ford Focus, Mazda3 and Volvo S40 ranges will share 60 per cent of their total components, but future Jaguar models will have unique - and not Ford-sourced - floorplans.

The upcoming Ford Focus, Mazda3 and Volvo S40 ranges will share 60 per cent of their total components, but future Jaguar models will have unique, and not Ford-sourced, floorplans.

The project, called C Technologies, will be the first large-scale platform-sharing between three Ford-owned brands in Europe. It will account for seven different body styles (including the Focus C-MAX compact MPV, featured on CARtoday.com earlier this month) and cars built in 13 countries, totalling 1,6 million cars a year.

According to analysts, the project will enable the in-house teams from the different companies to contribute their specific expertise to the benefit of all the C Technologies-based models.

Ford will provide the ride and handling know-how, chassis engineering, systems engineering and the diesel engine development. Mazda will specialise in petrol engines and powertrain development, exhaust systems and cooling systems. Volvo will oversee the safety engineering, crash protection, structural design and the virtual construction technologies.

But the Ford Motor Corporation is determined to retain three distinct identities for cars from the three different brands.

Volvo project management vice-president Magnus Jonsson told that "we managed to create a fairly good win-win situation without this job being seen as a badge engineering job. The vehicles will be very different from a character and perception point of view."

The new S40 will be unveiled at the Frankfurt Motor Show, along with the Mazda3; the V40 and next-generation Focus will follow next year, reported.

By contrast, future Jaguars will be built on their own exclusive platforms. The replacements for the S-Type and X-Type won't share their underpinnings with Ford as is currently the case, but “instead will be engineered for a more sporting drive,” reported at the weekend. At present, the X-Type and Mondeo have a common floorpan, while the S-Type has the same chassis as the US-built Lincoln LS.

"Ford has learned its lesson and upcoming Jags will have to be unique to compete with rivals such as BMW," a source within the Coventry-based firm was quoted as saying.

As well as the platform, most interior components and suspension parts will remain unique to the Jaguar. Major components, like engine blocks, transmissions and wiring harnesses will be shared with other Ford brands, “but will be developed to provide Jaguar quality and character,” the report said.

Original article from Car