Volkswagen’s gutsy Touareg was recently driven to an altitude of over 6 000 metres, reaching the highest altitude recorded for a vehicle, according to the Guinness Book of Records.

Volkswagen’s gutsy Touareg was recently driven to an altitude of over 6 000 metres, reaching the highest altitude recorded for a vehicle, according to the Guinness Book of Records.

Situated on the Chilean Altiplano, the Ojos del Salado is the world’s highest volcano, and the site of the Touareg Expedition’s record attempt.

The team of eight, headed by expedition leader Rainer Zietlow, first crossed the Atacama desert, one of the world’s driest areas, before setting up base camp more than 4 000 metres above sea level. From there, the trail continued over snowfields and volcanic ash at a gradient of about 80 degrees.

The Touareg Expedition used factory-fitted winches, extra spotlights and rescue equipment to handle the rugged terrain as the team made its way up the slopes of Ojos del Salado to the rock-strewn summit. Upon reaching the summit on January 29, both the altimeter and GPS system displayed an altitude of 6 080 metres, though this was only to be confirmed by the Guinness Book of Records on February 16.

The Institute for Cartography at the University of Dresden in Germany helped plot the route to the top after concluding a four-week survey of the summit region.

The expedition was also able to install a seismographic station managed by the Geological Research Centre in Potsdam, Germany, to monitor regular earthquake and volcanic activity in the region.

Original article from Car