Apart from fitting a host of new aerodynamic components to its FW27s ahead of Sunday's Monaco Grand Prix, Williams-BMW has devoted much time to improving its drivers' race starts.

Apart from fitting a host of new aerodynamic components to its FW27s ahead of Sunday's Monaco Grand Prix, Williams-BMW has devoted much time to improving its drivers' race starts.
Currently lying in fourth place in the constructors' championship standings, the Grove-based team had an extended test session at the Italian Vallelunga circuit last week.
"The team concentrated on tyre testing for Michelin, but also worked on set-ups, cooling checks and starts. Monaco is a tight street circuit, where the grip level increases quite considerably over the weekend," Williams-BMW technical director Sam Michael said. "The increase is primarily due to the soft tyre compounds which lay a lot of rubber down. 2005 may see this pattern change slightly though, as the tyres now have to complete an entire race."
"Overtaking is virtually impossible at Monaco, so strategy will be important," Michael added. "And we have more aerodynamic improvements for the FW27 for Monaco.
Apart from qualifying well, Williams-BMW drivers Nick Heidfeld and Mark Webber will need to be particularly quick off the starting line in Monaco, BMW motorsport chief Mario Theissen added.
"At Vallelunga, we placed a strong emphasis on our practice starts again. Good starts depend on a combination of quick driver reactions, precise clutch control and optimum acceleration governed by the traction control system," he said.
"On Monaco's roads, good engine driveability at relatively low revs definitely pays off. Since the track modifications, the Rascasse corner at the harbour is no longer as tight as it was. Last season, the Loews hairpin was the only F1 corner where engine speed dropped down to the 5 000 r/min range in first gear.
Incidentally, in 2006 we'll be lamenting the passing of the variable intake trumpets on circuits such as this where you have to drive in unusual rev ranges. By adjusting the length of the intake manifold, we can currently achieve a fuller torque curve. This technology will be banned in the future V8 engines," he concluded.

Original article from Car